The Station Nightclub Fire, Part 3: Years After

Only three men involved in the Station nightclub fire are held legally responsible. But were there more to blame? Good comes out of darkness. Families and survivors band together to make sure the tragedy is never forgotten.
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The Station Nightclub Fire, Part 2: Seconds of Fire

In a matter of minutes, those still trapped inside the Station nightclub are on the verge of death. Can they still escape, or will they die trying?
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Lockwood Marches On: Chapter Three, The Lockwood Manufacturing Company 1910 to 1931

Note: The following is a republished excerpt from the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company’s Lockwood – The story of its past, the basis for its future. Published in 1953, and based almost entirely off of literature produced for Lockwood’s 1952 sales convention, it recounts the history of the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company from 1834 until 1952.

By 1953, the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company, then a division of the Independent Lock Company with both being headquartered in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, fielded branch offices in New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, and Selma, Alabama along with five manufacturing plants in Fitchburg and one in Selma.

We have made no changes to this excerpt and what you see is exactly how it was printed in 1953, albeit in a different medium.

Chapter Three, The Lockwood Manufacturing Company 1910 to 1931

IN THIS CHAPTER is recorded the real rise and fall of the old Lock Company as a factor in the builders’ hardware field of the period from 1910 to 1931. Like the old Nashua Lock Company reported in Chapter One, Lockwood Manufacturing Company of South Norwalk, Conn., had its successes and, in later years, its disappointments and final sale to a stronger organization.

By 1910, Lockwood was well established in the builders’ hardware industry. The extensive line, then being marketed, can be well visualized when we find, in the year 1814, a new catalog being published having over 700 pages. While it is probably true, stock hardware sales was the predominating part of the business, it is also true, Lockwood had become very much of a factor in the contract field. In those days, it was customary for manufacturers and distributors alike to maintain a fine sample room. When a large contract was to be let, the factory provided huge trunks of hardware samples to be displayed.

Unfortunately, many of the early records of contract jobs were not preserved, or if so, they were not transferred to the Independent Lock Company. From what meager information we do have, however, we know that Lockwood hardware was supplied on some of the outstanding buildings in the country during this period, many of which are still standing. Some of them were:

THE AUDITORIUM, Los Angeles, California
U.S. POST OFFICE & COURT HOUSE, Los Angeles, California
HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING, Sacramento, California
ST. FRANCIS HOTEL, San Francisco, California
U.S. TREASURY BUILDING, San Francisco, California
THE PENINSULA HOTEL, San Mateo, California
THE HAMILTON HOTEL, Washington D.C.
MASONIC TEMPLE, Jacksonville, Florida
ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, Atlanta, Georgia
ROCHAMBEAU APARTMENTS, Baltimore, Maryland
THE SOUTHERN HOTEL, Baltimore, Maryland
HORTICULTURAL HALL, Boston, Massachusetts
TECHNOLOGY CHAMBERS, Boston, Massachusetts
THE AUDITORIUM, St. Paul, Minnesota
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Kansas City, Missouri
VICTOR BUILDING, Kansas City, Missouri
STATE SAVINGS BANK BUILDING, Butte, Montana
THE STATE CAPITOL, Albany, New York
ST. GEORGE HOTEL, Brooklyn, New York
71st REGIMENT ARMORY, New York, New York
THE WORLD’S TOWER BUILDING, New York, New York
HOTEL SYRACUSE, Syracuse, New York
U.S. POST OFFICE BUILDING, Dayton, Ohio
STOCK EXCHANGE, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Y.M.C.A., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salt Lake City, Utah
RANDOLPH – MACON WOMEN’S COLLEGE, Lynchburg, Virginia Continue reading

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The Station Nightclub Fire, Part 1: Years Before

A small nightclub built in the late 1940s transforms over the years into a popular, local venue for live music and good evenings with friends until one fateful night it burns to the ground and claims one-hundred lives.
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The Cocoanut Grove Fire, Part 3: Phoenix of Paradise

With over four hundred people dead and dying at the Cocoanut Grove club, someone had to be to blamed. While investigators look for a cause, others work to make sure that the tropical paradise in Boston didn’t burn in vane. Continue reading

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The Cocoanut Grove Fire, Part 2: Inferno in Paradise

Tony is a kid who works at The Grove. Stanley works there too. Jimmy and Clifford are both in the armed forces and in the paradise at 17 Piedmont Street before heading out to war. All four would be forever effected by the inferno that awaited them that night. Continue reading

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The Cocoanut Grove Fire, Part 1: Wartime Paradise

November, 1942. America is at war. Mobsters still have control and influence on city inspectors, allowing them to skate past regulations and requirements. Guys getting ready to ship out to the battlefield want to take their gals on one last date. The Cocoanut Grove promises to be the place for a night they’ll never forget. It lives up to its hype as a south seas paradise, but for all the wrong reasons. Continue reading

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The Von Duprin Game Changer, Part 2: Flight to Safety

Every minute of every day in America there are emergencies. Multiple times a day people have to get to safety in a hurry and locked doors could mean a death sentence to them. Every state in the country, and most every city and county have laws requiring emergency exit devices on doors meant for people to get out and away from harm.

In 1911, however, there were few laws, if any, requiring this type of hardware. One hundred-forty-six people died in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, most because they couldn’t get out. Just months prior to that disaster, the owners had been strongly advised to install exit devices on the doors to the production floors, but they never did.

That disaster, and the Von Duprin exit device paved the way to what is now so common in North America, most people don’t even know what its called.

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Lockwood Marches On: Chapter Two, The Lockwood Manufacturing Company 1888 to 1909

Note: The following is a republished excerpt from the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company’s Lockwood – The story of its past, the basis for its future. Published in 1953, and based almost entirely off of literature produced for Lockwood’s 1952 sales convention, it recounts the history of the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company from 1834 until 1952.

By 1953, the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company, then a division of the Independent Lock Company with both being headquartered in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, fielded branch offices in New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, and Selma, Alabama along with five manufacturing plants in Fitchburg and one in Selma.

We have made no changes to this excerpt and what you see is exactly how it was printed in 1953, albeit in a different medium.

Chapter Two, The Lockwood Manufacturing Company 1888 to 1909

THE NEXT important era of this story was the origin of the Lockwood trademark, which has continued its good name with distinction. The earlier history of the Lockwood Manufacturing Company does not seem to have been as carefully preserved as was the earlier history of Nashua Lock Company, recorded in Chapter One. We do find, however, a folder from “The Master Locksmith,” of March 1930, that gives us some facts that piece together our continuing story.

According to this article, the “Lockwood & Lester Company was organized in 1878.” Money was tight in the early 80’s and it took tried and trusted ability to pave the success of any enterprise. The indomitable spirit of the founders, however, soon won a way and during Cleveland’s Administration, we found the housewives of Connecticut using Lockwood Cutlery and their children playing with toys made by the same company. As the business continued to grow, the firm sought new avenues of expansion.

There is in existence a brochure of many important buildings equipped with Lockwood hardware in those long ago days that are still in use today. Documental letters have been received from many of these users, stating that Lockwood hardware is still functioning remarkably well, considering the length of time it has been in use. Pictures of some of these buildings are reproduced here. By 1909, the firm was again well established in the builders’ hardware business and, while not then the largest producer, its products drew wide acceptance from leading architects and builders of that day.

Piggy Banks, Cap Pistols, Sad Irons; these were some of the interesting items in addition to builder's hardware, catalogued by Lockwood and Lester in 1887.

Piggy Banks, Cap Pistols, Sad Irons; these were some of the interesting items in addition to builder’s hardware, catalogued by Lockwood and Lester in 1887.

Note the "monkey shine performance" of the Monkey Shine Surprise Box.

Note the “monkey shine performance” of the Monkey Shine Surprise Box.

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Lockwood Marches On: Preface and Chapter One, Nashua Lock Company 1834 to 1889

Note: The following is a republished excerpt from the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company’s Lockwood – The story of its past, the basis for its future. Published in 1953, and based almost entirely off of literature produced for Lockwood’s 1952 sales convention, it recounts the history of the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company from 1834 until 1952.

By 1953, the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company, then a division of the Independent Lock Company with both being headquartered in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, fielded branch offices in New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, and Selma, Alabama along with five manufacturing plants in Fitchburg and one in Selma.

We have made no changes to this excerpt and what you see is exactly how it was printed in 1953, albeit in a different medium.

Preface

At the 1952 Sales Convention, a Pageant called “Lockwood Marches On” was presented by some sixty employees, executives and younger children of the coming generation, connected with the Company. The effort so far exceeded the hopes of the authors, that by sincere urging it has been re-edited and condensed as an historical record for friends of the Company to keep. It is the hope of the authors, that the reader will catch the inspiration, the human interest and the opportunity found possible only in the free enterprise system of America.

While admittedly, the story as written is designed to record the historical background and growth of the Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company, publicizing its struggles and achievements, recording its accomplishments and background, it is indeed more than that. It is a factual case of a brand name that has grown strong, over the years, in a free world. Statistics have been largely omitted, historical dates reduced to a minimum and only a few individuals have been named, so that the main story of Lockwood will stand out stronger.

It is a vital part of Lockwood’s history that back of the founders of the business, at each stage described, were many people who contributed much to the results recorded here. At no time in Lockwood’s history is the truth of the preceding statement better exemplified than as this history is written. However, time and space does not permit paying tribute individually.

The basic consideration in gathering the team that has been put together, has been the “know how” each individual has been able to bring into the organization to develop the policies and products now being offered. Lockwood Hardware Manufacturing Company is proud of its assembled team.

The following chapters set forth many of the important stages of the Company’s progress.

Chapter One, Nashua Lock Company 1834 to 1889

Early photograph of the Nashua Lock Company plant and its employees in Nashua, New Hampshire.

Early photograph of the Nashua Lock Company plant and its employees in Nashua, New Hampshire.

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